Resources for building your Facebook storefront

The ubiquitous social network is great for generating buzz about your products, but you can also sell your goods and services there.

By Angela West, PC World |  Small Business, Facebook

Larger online retailers might be interested in what Payvment has to offer. Even under this service's free plan, you can sell an unlimited number of products through one store, and you can import products in bulk using either a CSV file or its API. Upgrade to Payvment's Premium plan ($30 per month or $300 per year), and you can operate as many as five storefronts. You also gain additional marketing tools, including sales and social analytics, as well as the ability to promote products to Facebook fans automatically. On top of that, the Premium plan allows you to give up to three people admin privileges to manage your stores.

Wishpond

Wishpond is a smaller player in this market, but it has proven popular with small businesses and micro sellers as well as with larger operations such as Urshuz. Wishpond focuses on integrating your Facebook store with other e-commerce services, such as eBay, Etsy, and Shopify.

On a free Wishpond account, you can stock up to 20 products, and you get sharing features and basic promotions. If you upgrade to a Basic plan for $9 per month, you can operate a store with up to 5000 products, and you gain "fan-gating" capabilities (a fan-gated Facebook page displays different information to visitors who have "liked" your fan page than it does to those who have not). Upgrade to the Pro plan for $19 per month, and you gain advanced analytics features.

ShopIgniter

ShopIgniter specializes in providing Facebook integration and Facebook storefronts at the enterprise level, so it probably isn't of tremendous interest to small businesses. We've included it here more as a resource, so that you can see how bigger operations are running their Facebook storefronts.

Mail-order steak-flinger Omaha Steaks recently enlisted ShopIgniter's help to get its Facebook store off the ground using Facebook-only products, Facebook-exclusive pricing, and other innovative strategies that gained recent attention from AdWeek. Omaha Steaks sees an opportunity where other brands have encountered disappointment; only time will tell if its optimism is justified.

Angela West spends enough time on Facebook that she doesn't doubt its potential for e-commerce. She has written for big insurance companies, small wildlife-control businesses, gourmet food chains, and more. Follow her on Twitter (@angelawest) and on Facebook.


Originally published on PC World |  Click here to read the original story.
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