First glimpse: Cisco OTV

By Paul Venezia, InfoWorld |  On-demand Software, Cisco, Cisco OTV

It's important to note that the established connections to migrated VMs continue along their original data paths. Even though the VM ends up running at the remote data center, the existing TCP connections to that server must still pass through the initial data center to maintain the consistency of the connection. New connections could be rerouted to the remote data center, but an existing connection cannot. This could add significant latency and bandwidth consumption to the WAN links if not monitored. It should also be noted that current technologies put a distance damper on any effort like OTV, since VMotions on links with greater than 4ms latency can get problematic really fast. This roughly translates to 400km of physical separation. This isn't a limitation of OTV, but it's still a constraint.

Needless to say, Cisco's OTV isn't a technology that many companies need. However, to those that do, it's quite compelling. OTV isn't immediately ready to handle intercontinental data center linking, but it could certainly be used to connect data centers in New York City and Washington, DC, or anywhere within a 250-mile radius.

Although those distance limitations are the result of current data transport technologies, the framework is there to support anything coming down the pike. Once it's feasible to achieve 4ms latencies across a 2,500 mile link, OTV will be ready. As such, it goes a long way toward allowing geographically disparate data centers to play in the same pool while greatly reducing the chance of Layer-2 boogymen compromising the network. It's an important step in localizing remote computing resources.

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This story, "First glimpse: Cisco OTV," was originally published at InfoWorld.com. Follow the latest developments in virtualization, networking, and cloud computing at InfoWorld.com.

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Originally published on InfoWorld |  Click here to read the original story.
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