Today feels like a dancing robot day

Watch a bunch of 'bots dance better than a boy band

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If you want to watch a group of robots that can dance in synch while "using a quorum sensing mechanism", you're in luck.

Check out this video, courtesy of Aldebaran Robotics, in which they've teamed up with MIT's Nonlinear Systems Laboratory to perform such a feat. The goal of the team was to see if they could synchronize a group of the Aldebaran's NAO robots, but also "to allow robots to join or leave the group at any time (for example, a fallen robot should be able to stand up to rejoin the choreography)."

More details on the project, including a discussion of the quorum sensing mechanism and contraction theory, is available here.

Keith Shaw rounds up the best in geek video in his ITworld.tv blog. Follow Keith on Twitter at @shawkeith. For the latest IT news, analysis and how-tos, follow ITworld on Twitter, Facebook, and Google+.

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