Trend Micro makes push into desktop virtualization security

By , Network World |  Security, McAfee, Trend Micro

Trend Micro Monday is announcing an updated endpoint security product designed to go beyond protecting Windows environments to safeguard virtualized desktops based on Citrix XenDesktop and VMware View.

OfficeScan 10.5, which also adds support for Windows 7, will benefit from cloud-based intelligence about malware and other threats to intercede on behalf of users through the Trend Micro Smart Protection Network. There's an option for the enterprise to deploy a so-called Web Reputation server internally to get similar protections through a different type of configuration that could be even faster.

However, it's the OfficeScan Virtual Desktop Infrastructure (VDI) piece that represents the first step in Trend's effort to optimize virtual desktop security.

"There can be a performance problem using typical software on the guest operating system," says product marketing manager Joerg Schneider, alluding to the kinds of issues arising in desktop virtualization. Scheduled scans and updates that occur all at once in the virtual machine environment could even "bring the server down," he notes. "Sometimes the network gets saturated."

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So Trend's approach with the VDI component in OfficeScan 10.5, for use with XenDesktop and VMware View, is understanding where the OfficeScan 10.5-protected virtual-machine installation is within the enterprise and applying security processes through "VDI-aware" techniques, such as serialized scan operations and security updates.

There are also other optimization techniques involving base images and linked clones. OfficeScan 10.5 on both the traditional Windows-based desktops and virtual-machine deployments can be managed through a single console, supporting up to 20,000 protected endpoints. But Trend Micro is going to charge more for security on virtual machines--$8 more for the so-called "VDI-aware" than the $20 charged for the more traditional Windows-based desktop deployments, as measured by a base 1,001 seat count.


Originally published on Network World |  Click here to read the original story.
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