Security Manager's Journal: Incident shows IP still at risk

An engineer downloaded 400 service documents, then said, 'So long. I'm off to work for a competitor.'

By Mathias Thurman, Computerworld |  Security, intellectual property

It can take a bit of luck sometimes to find out about a security problem. A recent incident illustrates this and the need to do more to eliminate luck from the matter.

Trouble Ticket

At issue: There's no reliable way to know when someone is doing excessive downloading of intellectual property.

Action plan: Find a cost-effective alternative to the leading event management tool.

I've talked before about how protective my company must be of its intellectual property, including service manuals for the equipment we sell, which can cost millions of dollars. We have a homegrown Web app that lets our field service engineers find and download service documentation, and last week the manager who administers that app asked me to stop by his office. The app creates a log entry whenever a service engineer clicks on a document for download. Normally, an engineer might download one or two documents a week. But while troubleshooting a user issue, the manager noticed that one IP address had logged an excessive number of downloads.

He determined that the IP address was in use by an engineer who had just resigned with the intention of going to work for a competitor. Needless to say, it all looked quite suspicious.

I immediately informed the HR department, and then I told the engineer's manager that I would want a forensic image of the employee's laptop. I wanted to know what he did with the 400 documents he downloaded. Unfortunately, the results were inconclusive. We couldn't be sure that he had copied the documents to external media or forwarded them to an outside e-mail account. If he had done either of those things from his laptop at home, we would have no way of finding out; our data leak protection tool catches such activity only when it occurs on our network.

True, the documents did reside on his company PC, but that is not a crime or grounds for termination. Nonetheless, we read him the riot act, telling him that if we found out that he had taken intellectual property, we would pursue both criminal and civil charges, and his eight-year employment record would be marked "not eligible for rehire." But with no noncompete clause in his contract, we could do no more.

SIEMs Like Old Times


Originally published on Computerworld |  Click here to read the original story.
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