What your cloud computing provider doesn't know about security can hurt you

You're going to want to be protected. Here's how to make sure your cloud computing provider is up to the job.

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by Jeffrey Straka, SecureState - Everywhere you look, there are articles, research and analysis on the topic of cloud computing. It has even been termed, "the most significant shift in information technology in our lifetimes." The positive aspects are exciting and offer many benefits, including access to applications, storage for legacy data, and powerful computer processing - all with the click of a mouse. For companies that want to avoid purchasing entire systems of IT software and hiring the talent to operate and secure them, this option may seem very tempting. One common concern that should be analyzed and researched thoroughly is the issue of security in cloud computing. Any future cloud user should gather as much information as possible about their potential cloud provider before sending any data to the cloud.

[ See also: Cloud security: Root of trust ]

For instance, it would be wise to ask any potential cloud provider how they protect against malicious insider activity. One question that should be submitted is if a provider conducts background checks on all relevant employees. Nothing like sending PII to a cloud provider that lacks knowledge on who is working for them. Additionally, questions on employee monitoring, access determination, and audit trails would also be appropriate. Some providers may not want to divulge such technical information. If the cloud provider does not want to provide such information, ask if they have any monitoring and access control policies and procedures in place. If they don't, tell them to create some and make it part of the service contract. One way or another, you're going to want to be protected.

For those cloud providers that are providing Software as a Service where all development is handled on the provider side, questions on the system development lifecycle would apply. For example, customers will want to know if the cloud provider has incorporated security into their SDLC. Also, see if the future cloud provider takes into consideration the OWASP Cloud Top 10 during the development cycle. Lastly, ask the provider if they follow Cloud Security Alliance guidance for critical focus areas. If the cloud provider answers in the negative or has no idea what you're talking about, it may be best to look for another provider.

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