The 25 Worst High-Tech Habits (and How to Fix Them)

You’re doing a lot of stuff that's messing up your tech hardware--and your life along with it. Here’s how to do better.

By Christopher Null, PC World |  Security, privacy

"Hey, coworker! Looks like you had a great time at your pal's bachelor party. Oh, is that you posing with a Heineken in your hand? How original! Yeah, you and that girl look pretty wasted in that one. At least, that's what our boss said when he e-mailed it to me. Good luck with that evaluation!" Save such moments for posterity in private--or else. Pay close attention to the privacy settings on Facebook (and untag yourself in those compromising pictures) and on photo-sharing sites. On Flickr, for example, click Edit your profile privacy from the 'Manage your profile' page to control who can see what.

20. Believing the Salesperson

Let's put it this way: If that guy really knew a lot about computers, would he be wandering the aisles in a blue shirt and slacks asking if you need help? No. No, he would not. Do your research by googling for consumer reviews and comments before you get to the store, and learn which stores offer the best services and deals.

21. Ignoring the Specs

The big idea in tech today is to offer three classes of product: A bare-bones version, a power-user version, and an "extreme" version, each with an escalating price tag. The problem is, the extreme edition may not really do anything that the bare-bones version can't do--or it has features you don't actually need--but you buy the expensive one anyway, because you didn't really read the specs. It can take a lot of Web research time to figure out the meaning of some of the arcana--and what's really important--but this is time well invested.

22. Using One Password for Everything

All it takes is a single data leak at your cell phone company for a crook to get into your e-mail, bank, investing, online shopping, and Match.com accounts. It's one-stop shopping for identity thieves! Having a unique password for every site is unrealistic, but use a series of several passwords and save your best for the most critical sites. Password managers can help.

23. Not Having a Disposable E-Mail Address

Don't give out your regular e-mail address to newsletters, iffy Web services, and girls or boys you meet after midnight. A disposable e-mail address that you check once a fortnight is a better solution. This is why Gmail was invented.


Originally published on PC World |  Click here to read the original story.
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