Office 2010 gets its first critical fix

But no patch for actively exploited IE bug

By , Computerworld |  Security, Microsoft Office, Office 2010

Microsoft today said it will ship three security updates next week to patch 11 vulnerabilities, including the first in Office 2010 pegged "critical."

The just-released Office for Mac 2011 will also be patched for the first time on Tuesday.

Just one of the three updates was marked critical, the highest threat ranking in Microsoft's four-step system. The remaining updates were rated "important," the second-highest threat label.

Two of the trio will apply to Office, while the third will affect Forefront Unified Access Gateway 2010 , the company's VPN (virtual private networking) platform that lets enterprise workers connect with corporate applications when outside the office.

But the Office 2010 update was the one that got the attention of Andrew Storms, director of security operations at nCircle Security. "I wouldn't be a bit surprised to see 10 of the 11 [vulnerabilities] in the Office updates," said Storms.

The criticality of the Office 2010 flaw(s) surprised him. "It's the newest SKU, it has the newest file formats and the newest sandboxing," Storms said, referring to what Microsoft calls "Protected View" in the new suite.

Protected View , which has gotten a thumbs-up from security experts, isolates Word, Excel and PowerPoint files in a read-only environment that prevents malware -- which has piggybacked on Office documents for years -- from harming the PC or hijacking the system.

"Things are turned on their head this month," Storms said. "One of the bulletins is rated 'critical' for Office 2010, the newest version, but only 'important' for the older versions."

Typically, it's the other way around. Older editions of Office -- including Office XP and Office 2003 -- are prone to more flaws than newer versions, such as Office 2007 and Office 2010.

Tuesday's update for Office 2010 will be the first critical patch for the suite since it launched in May, and only the second ever for the application bundle. Microsoft patched an important vulnerability last month with the MS10-079 update.

November's patch slate is also significantly shorter than October's, when Microsoft fixed a record 49 flaws with a record 16 updates. Microsoft has taken to an even-odd security schedule, where it releases a large number of updates in even-numbered months, then follows that with fewer fixes each odd-numbered month.


Originally published on Computerworld |  Click here to read the original story.
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