Obama Administration fleshes out online trusted IDs

By , Computerworld |  Government, government, online identity

For one, the site makes it clear that the NSTIC is not an attempt to foster a national ID card and neither is it a call for the creation of a single Internet ID. It also stresses how the initiative will be largely private-sector driven and owned.

"NSTIC does not advocate for a required form of identification. Nor will the U.S. government mandate that individuals obtain an Identity Ecosystem credential," the FAQ noted. Rather, users will have a choice to obtain the credentials from multiple providers and choose among multiple credential choices.

"For example, a student could get a digital credential from her cell phone provider and another one from her university and use either of them to log in to her bank, her e-mail, her social networking site, and so on, all without having to remember dozens of passwords," the site noted.

NSTIC also requires that the Identity Ecosystem be based upon Fair Information Practice Principles to ensure that personal data is handled fairly and properly, the site noted. The goal is to put in place a system that will allow Internet users to securely authenticate themselves while revealing minimal personal information.

Jaikumar Vijayan covers data security and privacy issues, financial services security and e-voting for Computerworld.


Originally published on Computerworld |  Click here to read the original story.
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