Cisco announces three new security certifications

By Wendell Odom, Network World |  Security, certification, Cisco

It's Cisco Live this week - in London, at least. As usual, Cisco makes certification announcements around the time of the show, and this time the announcement has to do with Security. And while the actual announcements are interesting, the bigger deal is that Cisco appears convinced that the demand for security workers will exceed the supply, both now and in the coming years. Today I'll take you through some of the facts of Cisco's announcement, and then develop some of the reasons why Cisco believes security is a hot career area.

FOR MORE: Visit Cisco Subnet for daily news, blogs, discussions, Wendell Odom's certification blog

Cisco lists certifications in two broad categories: career certifications and specialist certifications. The career certifications include the broad and more commonly known certifications, like the CCNA, CCNP, and so on. The specialist certifications cover a narrower range of topics - sometimes directly overlapping with the technology in the career certifications, and sometimes covering topics outside the career certifications.

Before this week, Cisco already had several specialty certifications related to security. Cisco's adding three back to the mix this week:

  • Cisco IOS Security Specialist
  • Cisco Firewall Security Specialist
  • Cisco VPN Security Specialist

How do you get these? Well, you simply pass one or two of the current CCNP Security exams, and meet the pre-requisite of needing a current CCNA Security certification. The figure below shows the three new security specialty certifications.

These certs map directly to the exams in the new CCNP Security certification. In particular, if you pass all four exams to get your CCNP Security cert, I could 5 total specialty certs earned along the way - the three above, plus the IPS and ASA specialty certifications.

Cisco announces new CCNP Security career certification

Why the Focus on Security?

The bigger question that comes to mind, for me at least, is why all this focus on security? So, in the pre-announcement briefing, I asked. Here's the brief version:

1) Security Requires Role redundancy: Simply put, you can't go without a qualified person for short to medium periods of time. Everyone has to have some time off, go to classes and meetings, and so on, and the risk associated with having your only skilled person gone and unavailable is too much. The solution? At least have role redundancy, that is, have multiple people with real skills for each part of the security puzzle. Common sense, but this is one of the reasons highlighted by Cisco.


Originally published on Network World |  Click here to read the original story.
Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Answers - Powered by ITworld

ITworld Answers helps you solve problems and share expertise. Ask a question or take a crack at answering the new questions below.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Ask a Question