'Night Dragon' attacks from China strike energy companies

McAfee said the intrusions targeted intellectual property and have been going on for as long as four years

By , IDG News Service |  Security

Chinese hackers working regular business hours shifts stole sensitive intellectual property from energy companies for as long as four years using relatively unsophisticated intrusion methods in an operation dubbed "Night Dragon," according to a new report from security vendor McAfee.

The oil, gas and petrochemical companies targeted were hit with technical attacks on their public-facing Web sites, said Greg Day , director of security strategy. The hackers also used persuasive social-engineering techniques to get key executives in Kazakhstan, Taiwan, Greece, and the U.S. to divulge information.

The attacks have been linked to China due to the use of Chinese hacking tools commonly seen on underground hacking forums. Further, the attacks appeared to originate from computers on IP (Internet protocol) addresses in Beijing, between 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. local time there, suggesting that the culprits were regular company employees rather than freelance or unprofessional hackers, McAfee said in its report.

Although McAfee said a group of hackers likely executed the attacks, it had pinpointed "one individual" located in Heze City in Shandong Province "who has provided the crucial C&C infrastructure to the attackers."

"It is likely this person is aware or has information that can help identify at least some of the individuals, groups, or organizations responsible for these intrusions," McAfee said. Day said it is routine for McAfee to notify law enforcement in such instances.

McAfee's report is just the latest to underscore the continuing efforts of hackers to steal sensitive corporate information. In late 2009, Google said it had seen attacks believed to come from China, which targeted dozens of other multinational companies, called "Operation Aurora."

McAfee did not publicly identify the companies attacked, but Day said some employed McAfee's professional services consultants.

Writing on a company blog, McAfee's CTO George Kurtz said the attackers used "an elaborate mix of hacking techniques" but methods and tools that were "relatively unsophisticated."

But while seemingly downplaying the hackers' methods, McAfee admitted that it had only recently been able to detect the broad pattern.

"Only through recent analysis and the discovery of common artifacts and evidence correlation have we been able to determine that a dedicated effort has been ongoing for at least two years, and likely as many as four," the report said.

Day said that despite penetration testing designed to ensure a company's IT systems are secure, the breadth and complexity of corporate computer systems has made it increasingly difficult to link malicious actions together.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Answers - Powered by ITworld

ITworld Answers helps you solve problems and share expertise. Ask a question or take a crack at answering the new questions below.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Ask a Question
randomness