WikiLeak charges show future for private corporate data

Every company has dozens of Bradley Mannings ready to leak

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They dish about that all to each other, and sometimes post bits and pieces of it anonymously (not Anonymously, for the most part, though that may come in time) to the web.

Plenty of them also swipe information for their own benefit or to sell to identity thieves or competitors, though reporting and enforcement of those incidents tends to be hush hush.

Soon enough we'll see more of them posting sensitive data not for money, but for reasons they think of as altruistic, though as often it will be for revenge or simple rebellion.

Last year the news was filled with Gen-X or Y'ers fired or embarassed by Facebook photos of themselves acting drunk or stupid.

This year I expect it will become far more common than it is now for companies to be embarrassed in the same way; only it won't be the bosses being embarrassed who are doing the posting. So far it doesn't look like they'll be able to prevent it, either.

Kevin Fogarty writes about enterprise IT for ITworld. Follow him on Twitter @KevinFogarty.

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