The DDoS hall of shame

By , Network World |  Security, DDOS

Distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks like the ones that nailed WordPress blogs in early March have been around for decades, but it's only in the last dozen years that they've had enough impact  to grab public attention.

[ See also: DDoS attacks made worse by firewalls, report finds ]

With the rise and commercial availability of botnets that provide a distributed platform from which to launch these attacks the means to carry them out are accessible.

BEYOND DDOS: PayPal CISO says DDoS attacks just one of many threats 

Due to the cost, though, they have to be carried out by a motivated adversary bent on harm since there is little way to reap monetary profit from them aside from blackmailing potential victims with threats of crippling their servers.

Here are some of the notable DDoS attacks of the past few years:

Windows PCs become tools for denial-of-service attacks 

In 2000, DDoS attacks on Yahoo!, eBay, eTrade, Amazon.com and CNN were launched from commandeered Unix machines in businesses and universities, but a few weeks later the malware directing the attacks called Trinoo shifted to Windows PCs.

DDoS attack highlights 'Net problems 

Internet root servers were attacked in 2002, but the attacks were blunted enough for the servers to recover without a major take-down of the Internet itself. After the attack, limits on the Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) messages these servers will accept were set to ensure that type of attack in the future wouldn't succeed. The 13 root servers targeted run as the master directory for lookups that match domain names with their corresponding IP addresses

Estonia suffers massive denial-of-service attack

A spree of DDoS attacks against Web sites in Estonia in May of 2007 crippled Web sites for the prime minister, banks, and less-trafficked sites run by small schools. But most of the affected Web sites were restored quickly, and the government called for greater response mechanisms to cyber attacks within the European Union. Russia was accused of the attacks, but they could not be traced back to a single source there

Storm worm strikes back at security pros 


Originally published on Network World |  Click here to read the original story.
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