Security researcher slams Microsoft over IE9 malware blocking stats

'Where's the beef?' asks Sophos researcher

By , Computerworld |  Security, ie9, web browsers

Microsoft's claims that Internet Explorer 9 (IE9) blocks attacks just don't add up, a security researcher charged Friday.

"They're presenting only half of the equation," said Chet Wisniewski, a security researcher at U.K.-based vendor Sophos. "They put lots of numbers to make it seem all 'sciencey,' but they raise more questions than they answer. So really, where's the beef?"

Wisniewski was reacting to a Tuesday blog post by Jeb Haber, the program manager lead for Microsoft 's SmartScreen technology. In this post, Haber cited a wide range of statistics to show that IE9, which includes a new feature dubbed SmartScreen Application Reputation, has blocked a significant number of attempted malicious downloads from reaching PCs running Vista or Windows 7 .

Among Haber's key points: Microsoft's data showed that one in every 14 downloads by Windows users is malicious, and thus blocked by IE9.

Microsoft also argued that IE9's Application Reputation, or "App Rep," stymied socially-engineered attacks, the kind that rely on duping users into downloading and installing a dangerous file containing code that compromises a computer and infects it with malware.

"Microsoft is comparing apples to ... nothing," said Wisniewski in a Friday interview. Because IE9's unable to block exploits of such software as Adobe Reader and Flash, Apple 's iTunes or Oracle 's Java, Microsoft's data doesn't show the real picture.

"Where are the numbers of exploits?" Wisniewski asked, referring to the attacks, often conducted not through downloads but by drive-by hacks leveraging vulnerabilities in Microsoft's own software or popular third-party programs.

The result is a partial picture, one that Microsoft presented as public relations move, said Wisniewski.

"They're not comparing their numbers with actual exploits, so I feel like they're lying to me," he said. "No way do I ever get near a factual argument."

Wisniewski also pointed out flaws in IE9's download blocking, using Microsoft's own statistics to back up his case.


Originally published on Computerworld |  Click here to read the original story.
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