Being anonymous doesn't protect hackers from arrest in Spain, Turkey

In fact, it's getting dangerous to be Anonymous anywhere

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Turkish authorities have arrested 32 people they accuse of being members of the Anonymous hactivist group, raising the stakes for global Anonymi, following the arrest of three alleged members in Spain Friday.

Spanish police are charging their three suspects with a series of successful penetration attacks on various Sony networks.

The anonymous network launched "Operation Policia," which shut down some national-police Web sites Sunday night.

In Turkey the arrests followed an Anonymous DDOS attack Thursday and Friday called "Operation Turkey," which was designed to protest new Turkish rules that create four levels of acceptability for Internet content and penalties for those who violate them.

The four – standard, children, family and domestic – allow Turkish officials to define what content is acceptable under any circumstances, and further limit access to specific age or gender groups within the country.

The 32 are acused of trying to take tib.gov.tr and sgk.gov.tr offline in attacks Anonymous press releases said were due to censorship such as blocking YouTube within Turkey.

Anonymous opposes all controls on the Internet.

It also said it is not responsible for the Sony hacks, despite threats to bring various Sony sites down for offenses against PlayStation gamers.

In the U.S. the FBI is also investigating members of the group following its role in the attacks on banks and credit-card companies that refused to help donors contribute to the defense of WikiLeaks' founder Julian Assange, who was arrested on sexual-assault charges shortly after the beginning of a stink over publication on WikiLeaks of secret U.S. State Dept. cables.

Supporters charge arresting DDOS attackers is ethically analogous to arresting protesters who block city streets during protest marches.

Security people tend not to differentiate much between DDOS and penetration attacks, at least in their desire to punish the perpetrators, whether they're anonymous or not.

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