After dismissing 4th Amendment for FBI, court slams Google for tapping open WiFi

Google may face prosecution for mote in eye while feds are applauded for beam in their own

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Najibulla Zazi – an Afghan living in Colorado who planned a suicide attack on New York's subways.

The rest " were broken open due to the combination of well-deployed undercover agents, information from citizen or undercover informants and tips from foreign intelligence agencies," according to the report. (Google Docs Quickview, or PDF).

 

"We find good evidence that controversial CT [counterterrorism] tactics may have been counterproductive in several ways: increasing the ratio of informational ‘noise’ to terrorist ‘signal,’ undermining the state’s legitimacy among potential civilian informants, and legitimizing terrorists’ preferred status as ‘warriors.’ In no case is there credible evidence showing that these controversial CT measures significantly helped catch terrorists or offered other strategic advantages outweighing their disadvantages," the report read.

Though some have suggested that post-9/11 CT tactics have aided efforts to thwart terrorist attacks, all available credible evidence suggests that the foiling of terrorist plots since 9/11 has owed to the help of citizen informants, foreign intelligence tips, and standard police work — a conclusion that security officials and other recent analyses affirm.

As FBI Special Agent George Venezuelas said in a press conference after Faisal Shazhad’s failed Times Square bombing attempt: “It’s the tips from the public that really disrupt these terrorist plots.”

Giving up civil rights in exchange for more protection doesn't work, as Ben Franklin said in 1759 and Shipley repeats in a modern context.

Photo Credit: 

John Snyder/Wired.com

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