Suit charges Sony laid off security before big hack, spent only protect itself afterward

Lock your own door, but leave customers outside to face wolves? Classy move, Sony

By  

It did not encrypt usernames, passwords, email addresses or other personal data of customers, and was slow to do anything that would close the breach, the suit charged.

“While Sony knew that these basic security measures were necessary to protect its proprietary systems, it chose to cut corners when it came to its customers’ personal information and failed to implement similar safeguards on the PlayStation and SPE networks,” according to the 30-page complaint against Sony. Eighteen other suits have been filed against it as well.

The suits will probably be wrapped up into one big class-action suit that will be settled less than a month before it's due to go to trial, with most of the money going to law firms, technical experts and forensic investigators.

The odds of any of the PlaystationNetwork players making a significant chunk of money for the pain of being forced out of their favorite game is remote.

Charging Sony's negligence set them up for fraud and identity theft carries much more heft, but not enough to make individual claims stick out enough to force Sony to cough up any more than the few million that would be routine for a company its size, and which would shrink down to pizza money by the time any of the plaintiffs actually see it.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Spotlight on ...
Online Training

    Upgrade your skills and earn higher pay

    Readers to share their best tips for maximizing training dollars and getting the most out self-directed learning. Here’s what they said.

     

    Learn more

Answers - Powered by ITworld

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Ask a Question