Should 'News of the World' phone hackers do jail time?

By , ITworld |  Security, hacking, privacy

Rupert Murdoch and Rebekah Brooks

News Corporation CEO Rupert Murdoch leaves his flat with Rebekah Brooks, Chief Executive of News International, in central London July 10, 2011. Britain's biggest selling weekly newspaper hit the streets for the last time on Sunday, victim of a phone hacking scandal that has sent tremors through the British political establishment and may cost media baron Rupert Murdoch a lucrative broadcasting deal.

REUTERS/Olivia Harris

The British love their over-the-top tabloid papers, which make the US tabloids that people read surreptitiously at the grocery store check out lines look completely tame. But now the Rupert Murdoch-owned News of the World tabloid, accused of hacking into thousands of voice mail accounts, has been shuttered, throwing hundreds out of work. The paper's employees are being questioned by Scotland Yard in increasing numbers. Rupert Murdoch (who owns everything Fox and the Wall Street Journal, etc.) is taking more heat than ever before, hence the closed tabloid (at least for now).

Eavesdropping on celebrities is one thing, but hacking and writing about voice mails of dead British soldiers outraged our friends across the pond. Add in that supposedly deleting messages of a murdered teenage girl means felony tampering with evidence.

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