Review: Norton Mobile Security

By Preston Gralla, Computerworld |  Security, Android, Norton Mobile Security

If you need to locate your device, a text message with a link is sent back to the phone from which you're sending the text. Click the link to see the location in Google Maps. Keep in mind, though, that the location will only be as precise as your lost phone's location capabilities. So, for example, if you've got GPS turned off, the phone will find its location via triangulation techniques, which is much less precise.

You can also block SMS messages and phone calls from numbers you specify -- which, in a world in which text messaging spam is becoming increasingly common (and annoying), is a very useful feature. The process is quite simple and comes with a robust set of tools. You can enter the numbers you want to block by typing them in manually, selecting them from your contacts or (most useful of all) selecting them from your call log or SMS log. This last option is probably the most satisfactory, because it lets you block spam phone calls and texts right after you receive them.

When you get a call from your blocked list, it is sent straight to your voicemail. When someone from the blocked list sends a text, it simply doesn't get to you. You can review logs of all blocked calls and SMS messages and, if you decide you've made a mistake, easily unblock calls.

The Web protection feature, also in the for-pay version, will block phishing sites and sites known to harbor malware. You have the option of overriding the block when you try to visit a site, although the override will last for only 30 minutes. And it works only with the built-in Android browser, not with third-party browsers such as Dolphin.

Is it worth it?

Do you need Norton Mobile Security -- and if so, is it worth upgrading to the $30-per-year version rather than staying with the free Lite version?

Given that malware is increasingly targeting Android, you should have an anti-malware blocker such as Norton Mobile Security on your device. The free remote lock capabilities are also useful.

Note that Symantec isn't the only company offering these types of services. An existing product, called Lookout, offers a similar set of features. It has a free version that includes anti-malware protection, data backup and a phone finder that makes a siren-like noise. The for-pay version ($2.99 per month, or $29.99 a year) adds remote wipe and lock along with privacy and anti-phishing features. Because the free version of Lookout doesn't include the remote lock, between the two, I'd opt for Norton.

At a Glance

Norton Mobile Security

Symantec

Price: Free for Lite version; $29.99/year for Premium version


Originally published on Computerworld |  Click here to read the original story.
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