Chinese superhackers caught on video attacking site in U.S.

In documentary warning of U.S. cyberattack, Chinese hackers are shown launching their own

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China has been accused so often of being the source of waves of cyberattacks against U.S. government and corporate sites that "Chinese hackers" have become the bogeyman of global cyberwar.

The Chinese government has denied any involvement, going so far as to claim its servers are attacked more often than any in the world, imply the attacks may only be routed through China and not originate there and claim hacking the servers of foreign governments for very specific information about Taiwan and other concerns of Chinese government officials is a kind of folk hobby that country people engage in to keep themselves entertained.

A 20-minute documentary released by the Chinese military may give the lie to all those stories.

The documentary, titled "Military Technology: Internet Storm is Coming" is designed as a warning about the growing threat of international cyberwar.

For about six seconds during the video, however, the screen shows what analysts at security company F-Secure Labs describe as a hacking tool being used on a Chinese government system to attack a site housed in a U.S. university.

The IP address of the site (138.26.72.17), which is affiliated with the dissident religious group Falun Gong , is assigned to the University of Alabam in Birmingham.

The video, which originally ran on the Chinese government-sponsored site CCTV 7: Military and Agriculture.

According to Epoch Times, a Chinese/English publication often critical of the Chinese Communist government, the screenshots show the name of the software and the university where it was developed – the Electrical Engineering University of China's People's Liberation Army.

[Blockquote]

The software window says "Choose Attack Target." The computer operator selects an IP address from a list—it happens to be 138.26.72.17—and then selects a target. Encoded in the software are the words "Falun Gong website list," showing that attacking Falun Gong websites was built into the software.



A drop-down list of dozens of Falun Gong websites appears. The computer operator chooses Minghui.org, the main website of the Falun Gong spiritual practice," the Epoch Times report said.[/blockquote]

Photo Credit: 

Source: Screen cap from F-Secure.com

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