Fate of webcam spies show courts take hacking seriously when nudity and showers are involved

.mil and .gov sites get hacked regularly, but courts crack down on domestic cyber-spies

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Before even mentioning the story about a California man convicted two weeks ago for spying on women using their own webcams I have to say the best thing about the story is not that it's the second such incident this summer or that the page on which I found it had a link at the bottom to a how-to story with the title Track Cheating Spouse With Phone Spying Software.

The important thing about the story is that it shows hackers are sometimes interested in things more creepy than money or political protest.

OK, I have that backward. The real cause/effect chain, I think, is that hacking tools and techniques have become so common and easy to use that even creeps who spend more time on porn sites than hacker forums can use them.

And, of course, that normal people have come to depend so heavily on their computers they don't understand that they have to depend on the ethics of repair techs whose work they can't check, making them ideal victims even for mouth breathers like these two shining examples of the technocracy.

The more egregious example is photography buff Luis Mijangos – a 32-year-old Sana Ana, Calif. man convicted of hacking into the computers of more than 100 women and teenage girls – who admitted taking nude or compromising pictures of his victims, took pictures secretly using their webcams or pretended in email or instant-messaging to be a boyfriend trying to persuade them so send nude pictures of themselves to him.

In extreme cases he threatened so send the secret photos and videos to their families and friends (whose contact information he also stole) if they didn't send him nude photos of themselves.

In one case he actually did post nude photos on the MySpace page of a 35-year-old woman identified only as G.M in court documents.

Mijangos – a Mexican citizen confined to a wheelchair since he was struck by gunfire in a drive-by shooting when he was a teenager – pleaded guilty to computer hacking and wiretapping in March.

Probation officers recommended a two-year sentence; prosecutors asked for seven. The maximum sentence is 10 years.

Photo Credit: 

Source: Fullerton Police Dept. booking photo, Trevor Harwell

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