Too many people hate Bank of America to point at a suspect who may have hacked it

Bank was not hacked, spokesperson insists; its sites are very reliable. Sometimes

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But no one ever explained adequately how so many companies – all with sophisticated, robust network infrastructures (as required by law, in this case) managed to have similar but unrelated problems all at the same time.

Bank of America also lost $10 million in May following a data breach in which an insider stole and sold customer data to hackers who evidently preferred sneakernet to Ethernet for the transport of covert data.

Other banks are also charging debit-card fees, following changes in banking regulations that cap the fees credit-card companies and banks can charge per transaction, from an average of about 44 cents to 21 cents plus 0.05 percent of the cost of each transaction, according to MotleyFool.com's Morgan Housel, who argues it's silly to get angry at banks over fees they can't control.

Much better, says everyone else, to get mad about the fees they charge when they don't have to – a game of trap-the-customer at which Bank of America is one of the best.

Anonymous – the hactivist group that has become the usual suspect in any publicly acknowledged hacking incident, has been a problem for Bank of America in the past, including releasing emails and other documents originally obtained by WikiLeaks that alleged BofA inflated fees for mortgage customers with a scam involving a mortgage-insurance company it also owned.

It's hardly alone among potential suspects, however. Bank of America also has a thriving, active and angry anti-fan club, whose members make a point of linking to sensitive documents others have released.

The counterculture isn't the only one that dislikes BofA, though.

"It seems that old habits die hard for Bank of America. After years of raking in excess profits off an unfair and anti-competitive interchange system, Bank of America is trying to find new ways to pad their profits by sticking it to its customers," according to U.S. Senator Dick Durbin (D-Ill.), who sponsored the legislation that capped the fees.

Photo Credit: 

BofA home page, mid-day Eastern time today

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