700 arrests at Brooklyn Bridge are nothing; Anonymous is invading Canada

The last few times Americans invaded it didn't work out; so Anon outsourced to Canadians.

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Except for an arrest here and there and some vocal complaining online about excessively authoritarian governments overseas, Anonymous has been relatively quiet for a week or so. Quiet online, anyway.

In the real world, more than 700 people were arrested Saturday during a protest Anonymous has been helping to organize and conduct, members of the group plan to occupy Los Angeles, worrying about getting kicked off Facebook, getting arrested and – astonishingly – getting Canadians riled up enough to organize and plan an event specifically to be impolite. That last one may have required genetic manipulation, or it may be that even members of the most orderly, considerate culture in North America have also gotten a little sick of the never-ending recession and patronizing attitude of financiers who place vague blame for the recession on consumers who allowed their spending to droop along with their incomes, and the unemployed who persist in not being employed or independently wealthy.

Occupy Toronto may be as polite an event as anything else Canadian except mosquitoes and hockey, but the intent, restrained anger, techniques and excessively vague demands are the same as the defensively polite Occupy Wall Street protesters who have been disrupting traffic, routine policework and the zeitgeist of New York (though not, apparently, Wall Street) for the past two weeks.

“We are determined to recognize the grievances of Canadian Citizens with regards to our Economic and Financial Policies,” according to a statement on the Occupy Toronto Market Exchange Facebook page. “It has become clear to us that there is a great deal of unethical and unjust behaviour among our corporate elite.”

Photo Credit: 

REUTERS/Jessica Rinaldi

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