Facebook admits 1 in 4 chance your account will be compromised this year

Facebook compiles masses of private data in user accounts; 60K of them are hacked or corrupted every day

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By this time no one really expects a lot of security from Facebook.

The Internet's most popular black hole of personal data has improved login security quite a lot this year – especially after founder Mark Zuckerberg's personal account was hacked in January.

Facebook added an an optional encrypted HTTPS connection and a form of behavioral analysis called "social authentication" that would flag the accounts of people who seemed to be logging in from places too far apart geographically to be the same person.

It also maintains a simplistic how-not-to-be-hacked security tips page and offers free six-month demos of McAfee security to users worried about having their accounts cracked.

Facebook leads market in methods to violate users' trust and privacy

C
ritics warn that the real security risk is from Facebook itself, which keeps a record as much as 800 pages long of data on users, that includes such extranea as every person who has ever Poked you and every conversation you've ever had.

Even after you delete the data – even after you delete your whole profile – Facebook keeps that data, with your name and all the other personal information associated with it.

Even when faced with fines for violating specific privacy laws of some countries, Facebook refuses to delete or turn over all a user's personal data, in order to protect its trade secrets. Those secrets presumably include how much data it actually keeps after pretending to delete it and how it packages and sells your personal data to third parties.

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