Fake threat against Facebook dwarfs Anonymous' real attacks on Israel, Finland Portugal

Empty boasts wear out an audience so they can't hear even when you have something to boast about.

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The leaders of the largely leaderless group use peer pressure and arguments to keep a lid on some of the more rambunctious subdivisions – groups like LulzSec, which branched off from Anonymous then merged back with it for a little obscurity security. Even the leaders don't work that hard at it. Suppression isn't their style.

"Their" style doesn't include taking down social networks. It does include banks and credit-card companies and cult-like churches and police agencies and foreign government offices and electronics manufacturers and PayPal. But not Facebook.

It got a lot of press attention for that, too. Good thing it was all a fake so people could concentrate on some far more meaningful gesture to mark Guy Fawkes day.

One thing you can be sure: Anonymous spent Guy Fawkes day aggressively and specifically not attacking Facebook.

What did it do?

It attacked Israel, Finland and Portugal.

Seriously.

In Israel DDOS attacks brought down web sites of the Israeli Defense Forces (army), Mossad intelligence services and Shin Bet internal security service, among others.

In a YouTube video Anonymous warned that the siege of Gaza is illegal and that Israel was "justifying war, murder, illegal interception and pirate-like activities under an illegal cover of defense."

Portugest anonymi defaced five national websites, including the youth division of the ruling Social Democratic Party, according to TheRegister.

Anonymous Finland also took credit for the release of the private information of 16,000 people it claimed to have stolen from government databases cracked using SQL injections. It took the information down soon after.

They wanted to embarrass the government into improving its security, according to TheReg.

Attacks on sovereign countries are small potatoes, though. Hardly worth even noticing if what you were expecting was something spectacular and meaningful like an attack on Facebook.

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