Team Poison, Anonymous campaigners claim first victims of OpRobinHood

Phantom reports cracking two banks sites without touching data, to protect the 99%

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Team Poison and Anonymous – AKA PoisAnon when referring to the portion of each group working in cooperation to hack and harass commercial banks – have counted coup in the campaign they call Operation Robin Hood, but didn't actually draw blood.

The alliance of a subset of Anonymous and Team Poison (which spells itself TeaMp0isoN, keeps a fan page on Facebook) announced yesterday they were launching Operation Robin Hood (#OpRobinHood).

OpRobinHood is a campaign to attack and, where possible, defraud large commercial banks for the benefit of the same mass of non-rich, non-powerful majority the Occupy Wall Street movement protests were organized to represent against what organizers called the economic injustice and exploitation by the banks, brokers and investment houses that make up the global financial industry.

Though both TeamPoison and Anonymous have attacked banks and financial-services companies in the past, neither has overtly tried to steal from or defraud the banks.

The first two successes touted by PoisAnon sticks to the hacktivist ethic that allows sabotage against large corporations but frowns on outright theft.

In two updates unconfirmed by the victims, PoisAnon claims to have found the weakness of two banks: The First National Bank of Long Island and the National Bank of California.

TeamPoison member or affiliate Phantom~, claimed to have found a flaw in the security of National Bank of California and that SQL injection and XSS exploits cracked the first line of security at the First National Bank of Long Island's main site, according to a description posted on PasteBin by Phantom~.

Neither bank has publicly admitted any damage or even illicit access.

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