RIAA calls third-world teens downloading Jay-Z a threat to national security

RIAA exec: Only harsh approach of SOPA can halt threat to the jobs of RIAA honchos

By  

The lobbying/activist/obsolete-business-model-defending political wing of the Record Industry Association of America (RIAA) has finally come out with a clear indisputable reason Americans should support the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) that contains provisions to violate at least three of the first 10 Amendments to the U.S. Constitution:

Failing to enact a law that assumes anyone accused of content piracy is guilty and giving the Dept. of Justice the right to make whole web sites disappear with no warning or chance to defend themselves against baseless accusations would put the security of the nation at risk.

No kidding.

In a blog entry posted Wednesday, RIAA Senior Executive VP Mitch Glazier dismisses a bill proposed as a less-unconstitutional alternative to SOPA because it would make the U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC) responsible for enforcing copyright violations overseas rather than the Dept. of Justice.

"SOPA was introduced to address the devastating and immediate impact of foreign rogue sites dealing in infringing and counterfeiting works and products.  Every day that these sites operate without recourse can mean millions of dollars lost to American companies, employees, and economy, and an ongoing threat to the security and safety of our citizens. – Mitch Glazier, senior executive vice president, RIAA, Jan. 4, 2012 [emphasis mine – KF]

Clearly the devastating and immediate impact of rogue organizations pressing for the elimination of the inalienable rights on which the nation was founded is incomparably less critical to the safety and security of that nation than the threat of third-world teenagers downloading Rihanna and LMFAO.

Why the FBI, not the ITC should be in charge of arresting Chinese music pirates:

The ITC – which was created to enforce tariffs and other laws designed to even-up the balance of trade by protecting U.S. industries or un-protecting those of other countries – takes far too long to enforce anything, Glazier wrote. He cites a patent-infringement case brought by Kodak against Apple and RIM, which was filed in January, 2010 and may be resolved by September, 2012 – as an example of ITC's quickest enforcement work.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Spotlight on ...
Online Training

    Upgrade your skills and earn higher pay

    Readers to share their best tips for maximizing training dollars and getting the most out self-directed learning. Here’s what they said.

     

    Learn more

Answers - Powered by ITworld

ITworld Answers helps you solve problems and share expertise. Ask a question or take a crack at answering the new questions below.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Ask a Question