RIAA chief hits new heights of hypocrisy in pro-SOPA NYT op-ed

Accuses opponents of most of the sins of his own industry, plus a few he just made up

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Most of that time it spent chasing down grandmothers to try to scare consumers into buying overpriced CDs rather than download or stream just the content they wanted.

The entertainment industry is still in dire straits, Sherman wrote, ignoring recent reports showing that, given a decent opportunity to do so, consumers will actually buy music rather than steal it in most cases and that the American music industry is the leading beneficiary of paid-music services growing by leaps and bounds worldwide.

During 2011, the number of consumers using paid subscription services rose 65 percent to 13.4 million, the percentage of U.S. Internet users on P2P file-sharing services dropped to 9 percent in 2010 from 16 percent in 2007 and revenue from digital music sales rose 8 percent worldwide according to a recent a new report issued by IFPI (International Federation of the Phonographic Industry), the global version of the U.S.-based RIAA.

"Our digital revenues, at one-third of industry income (and now more than 50 per cent in the US), substantially surpass those of other creative industries, such as films, books and newspapers," according to IFPI CEO Frances Moore, in her editorial contribution to the report.

Sherman also ignores reports that all the dire predictions and alarming reports of financial loss due to piracy were based on nothing – literally nothing. The government studies cited as the basis of much of much of RIAA's complaints could never be found or presented by the agencies that supposedly conducted the studies.

Maybe Sherman should have read the IFPI report or looked around for the "government reports" backing up his case before crying poor-mouth about an industry that even on its worst was leaked cash from every orifice because it kept running out of places to keep it.

Pot calls kettle a hypocrite

Sherman also accuses Google, Wikipedia and other sites of violating their own support of net neutrality by arguing on their home pages that SOPA and PIPA would hurt their businesses, the services they provide to customers, the choices customers make about what to view or use online and force both site owners and customers into the role of enforcer for the RIAA.

That's editorializing, Sherman wrote, not an objective presentation of the facts.
Net neutrality, first of all, has nothing to do with editorializing.

Photo Credit: 

RIAA

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