Anonymous took down CIA.gov Friday, then didn't, then did, then did it again today

Even Anonymous news outlets seemed uncertain who actually downed CIA.gov

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Hacktivist collective Anonymous collected a lot of kudos Friday for taking down CIA.gov, presumably by DDOS attack.

Now it turns out Anonymous may not have been responsible.

The same YourAnonNews Twitter account that trumpeted the blackout as "CIA TANGO DOWN:cia.gov #Anonymous" at 3:25, changed its tune by later than night.

"We'd remind media that if we report a hack or ddos attack, it doesn't necessarily mean we did it...FYI."

Actually, when Anonymous news feeds report an outage as "tango down," it usually means either Anonymi or friends-of-Anonymous were behind the attack.

"Tango down" is a way to cheer an achievement, not report a problem with which the Anon have no connection.

The same phrase could be used to cheer some group of strangers with the chutzpah and resources to take down CIA.gov.

When it's someone else's work, Anonymous sources that announce the accomplishment typically give credit to the attackers, or at least make clear Anon are cheering from the sidelines rather than running the Low-Orbit Ion Cannon (LION) themselves.

("Tango" is milspeak for the letter T, which stands for "target," which is special-forces-video-game slang for anything you'd like to shoot. "Tango down" means you hit it.)

Anonymous takes credit, gives it back, then takes it again.

That doesn’t mean even plugged-in Anonymous sources such as YourAnonNews don't make mistakes. It's easy to assume any high-profile site outage is the result of an attack and that any attack comes from Anonymous, which is so diffuse and widespread a movement that it's easy for hackers to say they're part of or in sympathy with Anonymous even if they've never worn the mask or participated in Anon discussions or operations.

CIA.gov was down much of Friday night but was back online Saturday.

OK, yeah, we did it; some of us, anyway

Yesterday, the claim of responsibility was back on, as was a temporary new name for #F**kFBIFriday, an Anon celebration like Halloween, except it can happen every Friday, no one gets treats and the only ones tricked are the FBI and law-enforcement agencies.

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