Congress demands Apple divulge more privacy details

By , ITworld |  Security, Apple, Congress

Henry Waxman

Rep. Henry Waxman (D-CA) waves to reporters before U.S President Barack Obama arrived to meet with Democratic members of the House of Representatives about health care legislation at the US Capitol in Washington, March 20, 2010.

REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

iPhone's "unwanted online tracking" prompts demand from Energy and Commerce Committee.

The Subcommittee on Commerce, Manufacturing, and Trade, Henry A. Waxman ranking member, sent Apple's Tim Cook a letter. This follows up their initial letter of February 15, which Apple answered, but not completely enough, on March 2. Although Apple addressed these issues with an iOS update, loopholes remain that allow app developers to access private photos, videos, and location data, all without permission from the phone's owner.

Someone, but not necessarily Apple CEO Tim Cook, will need to go to a committee meeting to explain a story in The New York Times about a remaining loophole that gives app developers too much access to private information. The letter was polite but pointed in the information desired. Comments have been less polite and more pointed.

Yo, Congress

Congress just doesn't like competition in the invasion of privacy arena.
Boss Mojoman on gizmodo.com

Hey, Congress: why don't you STFU, leave one of the last great American companies alone, and help foster more of them by STAYING THE HELL OUT OF THEIR WAY?
joecassara on allthingsd.com

I hope that its not just Apple being singled out. Pretty much all tech companies that store any data need to be regulated.
thereisdwarf on gizmodo.com

Not helping

I'm so glad our Congress was finally able to solve our gargantuan deficit, our crumbling infrastructure, our failing schools, the money-sucking Post Office, etc. etc. etc., and now has time to focus on what *really* matters, like privacy issues on mobile phones.
k2director on appleinsider.com

So. Are those CEE people the good guys trying to protect people or are they the bad ones who want to get information they can use for their evil purposes?
chrimux on allthingsd.com

Apple opening the gates to make the iPhone a development platform for 3rd parties has allowed these malicious-type apps to slip in and become available on the app store, which poses a risk for people having their content hacked from their device.
WardC on appleinsider.com

Snarky

I hope it's private
Prince Caspian on gizmodo.com

That's O.K., Congress. We the People would like to have a chat with YOU about privacy.
theyouthblog on gizmodo.com

Sounds like some hacker snagged some wild Las Vegas pictures from some congressman's iPhone...
Fuzi Lojak on gizmodo.com

The next question: if the Committee doesn't like what Apple tells them, can they legally force Apple to change? Do we want a Congressional Committee to force Apple to change?

For the latest IT news, analysis and how-tos, follow ITworld on Twitter, Facebook, and Google+.

Now read this:
Developer declares 'I am done with the Freemium Business Model'
Khan Academy offers JavaScript as their first computer language
Study says Facebook profile can predict job performance

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Answers - Powered by ITworld

ITworld Answers helps you solve problems and share expertise. Ask a question or take a crack at answering the new questions below.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Ask a Question
randomness