Pentagon gets new spy agency, doesn't know how to use 100K spies it has

U.S.advances plan to have intelligence agencies outnumber enemies they spy on

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The problem is that the Pentagon has no excuse for not being able to get the answers it needs.

Though Pentagon officials imply other agencies don't supply quite the right information to answer critical questions, other intelligence agencies call the Pentagon's own intelligence-gathering efforts inefficien, insular and self-defeating.

Since 9/11 the Pentagon has expanded its fleet of intelligence-gathering drones from 200 to 6,000, each of which collect so much data to be analyzed and require so much maintenance and support that each mission requires almost 300 operators and analysts to complete, according to a January NPR story.

The Pentagon's existing intelligence operations include more than 100,000 people, all oof whom report to different bosses and operate under different budgets than the CIA or other civilian intelligence agencies.

The Pentagon doesn't share much of the data it uncovers and rarely fills in other agencies on its operations or findings.

It also works so closely with the militaries of Afghanistan, Pakistan and other countries that civilian intelligence agencies have to spend extra time scrubbing metadata from the intelligence they do send the Pentagon, according to NPR.. It wouldn't do to have U.S. generals accidentally expose top-secret CIA sources while sharing a report on Taliban activity with local Afghan army commanders, for example.

"You talk to officials who used to work or work today at the [Office of the Director of National Intelligence], and there's just frustration," according to historian Matthew M. Aid, whose book Intel Wars focuses on the conflicts, inefficiency and unrestrained growth of U.S. intelligence operations during the past 12 years.

'[In the book] I quoted one official as saying, 'It would be nice if the boys over at the Pentagon let us know what they were up to,' which I think gives a hint that says things could be more tightly controlled than they are right now," Aid said.

So, if the main problem is the amount or specificity of the information the Pentagon gets from the CIA, and the Defense Intelligence Agency already works closely with the CIA in the field, wouldn't it just be easier to have the Pentagon and CIA coordinate their efforts more closely rather than create a whole new agency?

Not among the rapidly proliferating political fiefdoms of the federal intelligence community.

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