Privacy advocates slam Google Drive's privacy policies

By , Network World |  Security

Dropbox's terms of use says: "You retain full ownership to your stuff. We don't claim any ownership to any of it. These Terms do not grant us any rights to your stuff or intellectual property except for the limited rights that are needed to run the Services, as explained below."

Similarly, Microsoft's SkyDrive terms of use also claim no ownership of user data.

According to Microsoft's policy, a user controls who may access their content. However, if you share content in public areas of the service or in shared areas available to others you've chosen, then you agree that anyone you've shared content with may use that content.

"If you don't want others to have those rights, don't use the service to share your content," the policy states. "You understand that Microsoft may need, and you hereby grant Microsoft the right, to use, modify, adapt, reproduce, distribute, and display content posted on the service solely to the extent necessary to provide the service."

Google's terms of use say: "You retain ownership of any intellectual property rights that you hold in that content. In short, what belongs to you stays yours. When you upload or otherwise submit content to our Services, you give Google (and those we work with) a worldwide license to use, host, store, reproduce, modify, create derivative works (such as those resulting from translations, adaptations or other changes that we make so that your content works better with our Services), communicate, publish, publicly perform, publicly display and distribute such content."

Google states in its official blog that its new privacy policy allows it to build a more "intuitive user experience." For example, if you're working on Google Docs and you want to share a file with someone on Gmail, "you want their email right there ready to use."

"Our privacy policies have always allowed us to combine information from different products with your account.... However, we've been restricted in our ability to combine your YouTube and Search histories with other information in your account. Our new Privacy Policy gets rid of those inconsistencies so we can make more of your information available to you when using Google," the company states.


Originally published on Network World |  Click here to read the original story.
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