Dog bites cop: Ironic use of force story of the day

Police dogs restrain Chicago police officer striking Occupy protester

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Blowback: Unintended consequences of a covert or military act of aggression.

It's not true that pictures don't lie. By highlighting one action but leaving out the context, a picture can lie by omission more concisely than words could.

Some pictures are worth a thousand words, but only those that are worth a different thousand words from everyone who sees them.

So this pic may tell the truest story from the Occupy protests in Chicago Sunday. Or it may be something completely different. (This one, a POV image of a Chicago cop punching a protester, got a lot of attention, but is too potentially misleading to be more than a partisan choice.)

Ostensibly the really telling pic shows a police dog trained for crowd- and riot-control restraining a police officer who struck unarmed protesters with a baton. A dog to the right is restraining a riot-armored K9 officer by clamping onto his pant leg; the cop's own dog is pulling on the leash (a huge no-no for trained service or police dogs), also apparently trying to restrain him.

The caption reads "even dogs know fascism when they see it."

Dogs don't know fascism. Dogs are smarter than we give them credit for; smart to realize it's not worth fighting over something you can't smell, taste, pee on or that is a fuzzy toy that squeaks maddeningly when you bite it.

The pic does show behavior consistent with the way a trained service or police dog would respond to the sight of one human attacking another. Usually they don't object if the attacker is their partner, of course.

Photo Credit: 

from Twitter, HaraKuro/@Godin222 tinyurl.com/bmfvatw

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