Make your writing (almost) perfect with editor

Serenity Software's Editor finds grammar and word usage mistakes that your word processor may miss.

By Liane Cassavoy, PC World |  Software, editor

As a writer and an editor, I have a love-hate relationship with Serenity Software's Editor (various pricing; ten-day free trial). This copyediting and proofreading application not only identifies common grammatical errors, but also thoroughly analyzes your writing for other weaknesses. I love that it focuses on good, solid writing. I just hate the fact that so many folks--myself included--actually need it.

Editor is available in two versions. The $55 Standard version analyzes documents from many word processors (including Microsoft Word), as well as many HTML, RTF, and all plain-text documents, but presents its output in a plain text file. If you're going to use Editor to analyze Microsoft Word documents, I highly suggest springing for the $75 Editor for Word, which includes the same features as the Standard version, but also features a Word add-in that allows you to see Editor's output within Microsoft Word itself.

Serenity Software suggests reading its help documents, which include a short Getting Started doc and a longer one, called "Using Editor Efficiently," before you begin using Editor. And doing so is necessary: The program itself is not entirely intuitive. To begin using either version, you close your document or file, and then open Editor. You then click the "Draft" button from the basic-looking but perfectly serviceable menu, and import your document into Editor. The company recommends doing this every time you use Editor.

Once your file has been imported, you're brought back to Editor's main menu, where you click "Usage." Here, you can decide which of Editor's tools you'd like to use: All, Fix, Spell 1, Spell 2, Tighten, Polish, and Consider. While the tools (called "Dictionaries") run quickly, you do spend a lot of time clicking buttons and viewing various menus; it would be easier to use Editor if these steps were combined in a more user-friendly fashion.

After these tools have run, you're brought back to the main menu again. Now it's time to view the results of Editor's analysis, and this is where the Standard version and Editor for Word part ways. In the Standard version, you're limited to viewing your work in a text document, where all the sentences are numbered, and are presented with a second text document that lists your "errors" according to sentence number. Using the Word add-in, you can view these errors (some of which may be mere suggestions) as pop-ups as you move through the document. The Word add-in provides a much more streamlined, user-friendly approach.


Originally published on PC World |  Click here to read the original story.
Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Answers - Powered by ITworld

ITworld Answers helps you solve problems and share expertise. Ask a question or take a crack at answering the new questions below.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Ask a Question
randomness