Security: What if all law enforcement agencies could do instant DNA analysis?

By , Network World |  Security, privacy

Richard Selden, CEO of NetBio, describes its ANDE System as a 'Rapid DNA' box that measures 26.6''-inches by 16.5-inches' x 23.1-inches' and can take an inserted cotton swab with cell samples from someone's cheek and produces a DNA profile in 83 minutes. Ruggedized for air, truck and hand-carry, it's "stable for at least six months without refrigeration," said Selden, speaking about it at the conference. It works in "an uncontrolled environment" with "no manual processing."

To match DNA, it can connect to a remote database or do the DNA matching in a local database onboard. The technology developed by NetBio is already being expanded into next-generation device that will accept very minute samples of DNA collected from cups or virtually anywhere for a DNA profile of the individual. The box is also being expanded to do "kinship analysis," Selden pointed out.

"Maybe a brother or sister will be in a terrorist database," said Selden during his presentation, noting there might be a "family of terrorists, siblings."

Identifying relatives is something the Department of Homeland Security would like to be able to quickly and easily do out in remote areas, said Christopher Miles, biometrics program manager in the DHS division for U.S. citizenship and immigration services.

The goal is to help legitimate refugees, for instance, gain legal entry to the U.S. but there's often a lack of authentic documentation, such as birth certificates, to help in assessing identity. There's a lot of lying about who is actually who, including who someone's relatives are. And there's the danger of human trafficking, especially of children and young women. But Miles, who spoke at the biometrics conference on the topic, said DHS will be doing field testing of the integenX and NetBios 'Rapid DNA' boxes to collect DNA information on candidates for U.S. entry.

Background: FBI eager to embrace mobile 'Rapid DNA' testing

And the FBI is planning on expanding DNA analysis to do more genetic analysis. There's the potential to not only explore family relationships through genes, but to find out about genetic disease in a much easier way than was once thought.


Originally published on Network World |  Click here to read the original story.
Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Answers - Powered by ITworld

ITworld Answers helps you solve problems and share expertise. Ask a question or take a crack at answering the new questions below.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Ask a Question