Microsoft move hints at the death of Windows service packs

Issues Windows 8 update after RTM, before launch, emulates Apple and Google

By , Computerworld |  Security, Microsoft, windows 8

Sinofsky described how in the past, Microsoft would make scores of changes to accommodate new PCs that computer makers had created, but that previously it had no way to distribute the resulting improvements to all users, including those running the new OS on older systems.

"During the final months of Windows 8 we challenged ourselves to create the tools and processes to be able to deliver these 'post-RTM' updates sooner than a service pack," Sinofsky wrote. "By developing better test automation and test coverage tools ... Windows 8 will be totally up to date for all customers starting at General Availability."

General Availability, or GA, is Microsoft-speak for the official launch and on-sale date.

Analysts and experts searched for reasons why Microsoft broke with tradition to push what wags have already pegged as "Service Pack 0.1."

"What's the mindset that they really want to break?" Cherry asked. "They want consumers and enterprises to believe that they don't have to wait for a service pack [to install Windows 8]. This is more of a statement of direction than anything. Microsoft's saying, 'We can get stuff to you on the fly, so as we discover, validate, fix and test, we now have a mechanism to release them.'"

A long-held rule-of-thumb, especially among IT administrators, was that it was smart to wait until bugs had been rooted out -- and a first service pack released -- before deploying a new edition of Windows. But that rule has been relaxed in the last few years, as Microsoft has encouraged users to begin upgrades before SP1. In 2007, for example, Microsoft argued that service packs were no longer necessary, then hemmed and hawed for months before finally announcing SP1 for Vista.

More recently, Microsoft touted regular updates as a reason why customers should acquire the upcoming Office 2013 by subscribing to one of its Office 365 plans.

"This 'slipstreaming' of updates is really not any different than what Apple has been doing for a long time," said Cherry. "They release iOS but then updates come pretty quickly."

Miller echoed that. "Look at Google, they're constantly introducing new features in Chrome OS," Miller said. "Browsers on Windows are the same. Google and Mozilla are constantly updating [Chrome and Firefox]. So Microsoft is just getting into what other vendors are doing, adding minor functionality. It may get people a little more excited about Windows 8."

Cherry had another explanation, one derived from a previous groundbreaking move by Microsoft.


Originally published on Computerworld |  Click here to read the original story.
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