Online security basics for small business websites

By Nathan Segal, CIO |  Security, antimalware, antivirus

A big challenge these days is keeping track of all the passwords you use on a daily basis. Sooner or later, you'll have too many to manage. This is where password protection programs come into play. Roboform and LastPass are two programs that I use on my computer.

An alternative to storing passwords on your computer is using a Flash drive and storing the passwords in a text file. When you need to use a password, simply highlight it and copy it as needed. Roboform2go for USB is one of many programs that will do this for you.

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One upside to this method of storing passwords is that copying and pasting won't be picked up by keylogging malware. On the other hand, if you use a cybercafe or other location with shared computers, know that they can be infected with malware. If you have to use one of the computers, virus scan your flash drive immediately after you use it.

Stay Away From Rogue Software

One of the fastest growing online scams is fake anti-malware software, sometimes referred to as "rogue software." It's marketed by ads that simulate genuine software programs. You'll encounter seemingly legitimate names, such as DriveCleaner, AdvancedPCTweaker and PC Cleaner 2008.

When you visit one of these sites, you're encouraged to run a scan on your computer for spyware. The scan will inevitably find that your computer is infected with spyware and will try to scare you into paying for the software to remove it.

Rogue software can slow down your computer. In addition, you could be charged for additional services or software you didn't purchase. Obtaining a refund is next to impossible; these companies frequently change name and URLs. To make matters worse, you could become a victim of identity theft.

Related: Twitter Spam Campaign Infects Users with Fake Antivirus Programs

Rogue software should be avoided at all costs. Here's a partial list of fake anti-malware programs. Bear in mind that the list keeps growing. Ultimately, if you think a program or company might be questionable, it probably is.

Protect Yourself From Spam, Email Scams


Originally published on CIO |  Click here to read the original story.
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