RSA betting its future on big data

By , Network World |  Big Data, Analytics, RSA

"This is what makes security interesting going forward," says RSA Chief Technologist Sam Curry in discussing the outfit's new position paper ("Big Data Fuels Intelligence-Driven Security"), which lays the groundwork for integrating big-data analytics into security operations. Pressed to say exactly how RSA will pursue such a strategy, Curry would only acknowledge more on products and services will be forthcoming soon. He emphasizes: "We're making a bet as a company on this."

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RSA late last year acquired Silvertail Systems, a Web analytics and behavioral analysis firm, and this will be figuring into what RSA plans for its big data security push.

The RSA position published paper today suggests any security company that doesn't find a way to make use of big data might want to fold up its tent right now.

"Within the next two years, we predict big data analytics will disrupt the status quo in most information security product segments, including SIEM [security information and event management]; network monitoring; user authentication and authorization; identity management; fraud detection; and governance, risk & compliance," the paper states. It goes on to say that within three years, data analytic tools will have evolved to enable a range of "advanced predictive capabilities and automated real-time controls." These, in theory, will form the basis of protecting against fraud and stealthy cyberattacks aimed at stealing critical information.

Today, there are a handful of security firms, including Red Lambda and Palantir, that have created tools and services that involve large-scale data analytics used to serve the purposes of security. Also, CrowdStrike is a startup that is expected to introduce a "big-data analytics platform" later this year.

According to RSA's perspective, big data harnessed for security purposes entails collecting vast amounts of information in real-time to build profiles of both users and systems to "spot aberrant activity or behaviors" that "often indicate deeper problems."


Originally published on Network World |  Click here to read the original story.
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