Tools for the paranoid: 5 free security tools to protect your data

Tools for protecting passwords, browsing anonymously, and encrypting our most precious documents.

By Erez Zukerman, PC World |  Security

You just read about another online database hack, and now 4 million users' names and passwords are floating around the Internet--and you have a sinking feeling that one of them might be yours. And then there are the security breaches you don't hear about, the ones that leave nasty surprises in your inbox or on your credit card statement.

[Twenty free and effective infosec tools and Can you spot the 10 security mistakes in this workspace?]

Because even a law-abiding citizen like you has a few secrets to keep, we've found five industrial-grade tools to help you hang on to what's yours. No need to enter a credit card number to get them, either--they're all free.

The cornerstone: KeePass

If you adopt just one security tool from this article, make it KeePass. This free and open-source password manager is available for Windows, with unofficial ports for iOS, Android, Linux, and Mac OS X. A secure, lengthy, completely random password goes a long way towards improving your security--and having a separate password for each and every website and service you use is the single most important thing you can do to keep secure.

For too many of us, the alternative to a password manager is using the same password everywhere. This means that if the user database of any one website you sign up for is compromised, hackers can (and often do) try your username and password on many other websites and gain access. So, seriously: Use a unique, difficult password for each and every website you sign up for, no matter how little you plan to visit it.

KeePass lets you keep all of these username/password pairs in a securely encrypted database, protected behind a single master password--the only password you'll have to remember. And unlike commercial competitor LastPass, KeePass doesn't automatically put your password database in the cloud (although you can put it into Dropbox yourself).


Originally published on PC World |  Click here to read the original story.
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