The everyday agony of the password

By Rich Mogull, Macworld |  Security, passwords

Passwords are here to stay, headlines and technical advances notwithstanding. We might come up with viable alternatives on a smaller scale; but especially for the consumer world we live in, there are no broad, viable alternatives. And sometimes it doesn't even seem to matter: My friend who has used variations of "wordpass" for every online account over the past 15 years has never once had a one hacked. Meanwhile, I have a credit card with such obscure password rules that I don't even try to keep track of it anymore--on the rare occasions when I need to log in, I simply type in random junk and use the password reset tool.

Which gets to the heart of why I hate passwords: Not only do we not have any other options, I can't foresee the situation improving within my lifetime. Even the self-destruct system of the U.S.S. Enterprise is protected by a password (spoken, not typed).

In the end, passwords are like that second cousin who insists on sharing his political conspiracy theories every Thanksgiving. Dumb as they are, we hate them even more because we know we can never get rid of them.


Originally published on Macworld |  Click here to read the original story.
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