Drones a target of U.S. House bill

Legislation specifies that the government would need a warrant to collect information in a private place using a drone.

By Christina DesMarais, PC World |  Security, privacy

Last fall a research team at the University of Connecticut announced it was working on fully autonomous drones capable of "thinking" and navigating the hazards of their surroundings without human intervention and in groups, sort of like herd animals.

Despite concerns, there's plenty of interest in developing the technology and lots of people want to get their hands on it.

In fact, more than 1,000 people have pre-ordered a super quiet wing-flapping robot that resembles a dragonfly. The little UAV, which starts at only $119, comes with up to 20 environmental sensors, various cameras and GPS.

Users -- the first of whom should get their units in July -- will control it with various apps that will let them do things such as take aerial photos, play games and use for security.


Originally published on PC World |  Click here to read the original story.
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