Mandiant report on Chinese cyberespionage used as bait in spear-phishing attacks

Security researchers detected two spear-phishing attacks distributing exploit-ridden copies of the Mandiant report

By Lucian Constantin, IDG News Service |  Security

Attackers are using fake versions of a recently released report about a Chinese cyberespionage group as bait in new spear-phishing attacks that target Japanese and Chinese users.

The report was released Tuesday by security firm Mandiant and documents in great detail the cyberespionage campaigns conducted since 2006 by a hacker group known as the Comment Crew against more than 100 companies and organizations from different industries.

Mandiant refers to the group as APT1 (Advanced Persistent Threat 1) and claims in the report that it's likely a secret Shanghai-based cyberespionage unit of the Chinese Army -- the People's Liberation Army (PLA) -- code-named "Unit 61398."

The Chinese government has dismissed Mandiant's claims as groundless. However, the report received a lot of attention from people in the IT security industry, as well as from the general public.

It seems that this publicity has now led to attackers deciding to use the report as bait in new targeted attacks.

Two different spear-phishing attacks were discovered on Thursday using emails with malicious attachments that masqueraded as the Mandiant report, said Aviv Raff, the chief technology officer of security firm Seculert.

One attack targeted Japanese-speaking users and involved emails with an attachment called Mandiant.pdf. This PDF file exploits a vulnerability in Adobe Reader that was patched by Adobe in an emergency update Wednesday, security researchers from Seculert said in a blog post.

The malware installed by the exploit connects to a command-and-control server hosted in Korea, but also contacts some Japanese websites, probably in an attempt to trick security products, the Seculert researchers said.

Symantec has also detected and analyzed the spear-phishing attack. "The email purports to be from someone in the media recommending the report," Symantec researcher Joji Hamada said in a blog post. However, it would be evident for a Japanese person that the email was not written by a native Japanese speaker, he said.

Hamada pointed out that similar tactics have been used in the past. In one incident back in 2011, hackers used a research paper about targeted attacks published by Symantec as bait. "They did this by spamming targets with the actual whitepaper along with malware hidden in an archive attachment," Hamada said.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Spotlight on ...
Online Training

    Upgrade your skills and earn higher pay

    Readers to share their best tips for maximizing training dollars and getting the most out self-directed learning. Here’s what they said.

     

    Learn more

Answers - Powered by ITworld

ITworld Answers helps you solve problems and share expertise. Ask a question or take a crack at answering the new questions below.

Ask a Question