Apple received thousands of data requests from US law enforcers

Investigating robberies or searching for missing persons are among the most common reasons for requests, Apple said

By Loek Essers, IDG News Service |  Security

Apple received between 4,000 and 5,000 requests for customer data from U.S. law enforcement between Dec. 1 and May 31, the company said on Monday.

"Between 9,000 and 10,000 accounts or devices were specified in those requests, which came from federal, state and local authorities and included both criminal investigations and national security matters," Apple said in a news release.

Most common are requests from police investigating robberies and other crimes as well as searching for missing children, trying to locate a patient with Alzheimer's disease or hoping to prevent a suicide, Apple said.

"Regardless of the circumstances, our Legal team conducts an evaluation of each request and, only if appropriate, we retrieve and deliver the narrowest possible set of information to the authorities. In fact, from time to time when we see inconsistencies or inaccuracies in a request, we will refuse to fulfill it," Apple said.

Apple disclosed the number of law enforcement data requests two weeks after The Guardian and Washington Post newspapers reported that major Internet companies were indiscriminately sharing customer data with the National Security Agency (NSA) via a program called Prism that gives the NSA "direct access" to those company's servers.

Apple has denied any involvement in the program, saying that it first heard of the Prism program when it was asked about it on June 6. "We do not provide any government agency with direct access to our servers, and any government agency requesting customer content must get a court order," Apple said on Monday.

"We don't collect or maintain a mountain of personal details about our customers in the first place," Apple said, adding that there are certain categories of information which it does not provide to law enforcement or any other group because it doesn't retain it.

Messages sent over iMessage or FaceTime for example are protected by end-to end encryption, Apple said. No one but the sender and receiver can see or read them, Apple added.

"Apple cannot decrypt that data. Similarly, we do not store data related to customers' location, Map searches or Siri requests in any identifiable form," it added.

For this disclosure, Apple asked the U.S. government for permission to report how many requests it has received relating to national security and how they are handled. But Apple was only authorized to share some of that data.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Answers - Powered by ITworld

ITworld Answers helps you solve problems and share expertise. Ask a question or take a crack at answering the new questions below.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Ask a Question