Best tools for protecting passwords

By , Network World |  Security

We had problems using DirectPass with our Pro Preview version of Windows 8.1. It worked fine with XP or on our iPhone. It took an hour before all the identity listings and notes were initially synchronized but thereafter the sync happened pretty much in real time.

Also, the capture dialog on Windows 8.1 would appear at the same time the browser-based "save this login" message would appear. Trend acknowledges all of these items and is working on fixing them and making an updated client available when Windows 8.1 is released later this fall.

The good news is that it supports Windows from XP-SP2 up to and including the original version of Windows 8 and on both 32 and 64 bit versions. It is also available for Android (running at least v2.3) and iOS (running at least v4.3). DirectPass has a simple pricing plan: $15 per user per year. You can use it free if you just want to save at most five passwords with the tool.

Strom is the founding editor-in-chief of Network Computing magazine and has written thousands of magazine articles and two books on various IT and networking topics. His blog can be found at strominator.com and you can follow him on Twitter @dstrom. He lives in St. Louis.

How we tested password managers

We installed each product on a Windows 7 or a pre-release version of Windows 8.1 desktop. We also used Android and iOS phones and Mac desktops (if a client was available for these systems) as well as Windows servers, and various Web-based services such as Dropbox, Gmail, and a Wordpress blog site to test these logins.

We connected to the various websites with at least Firefox and Chrome browsers to try out the associated plug-ins, too. When there was a cloud-based service available to synchronize our password vault, we signed up for that service and observed whether our password data was propagated across to the various clients. We also took notes on the relative differences in the clients across different OSs both in terms of functionality and user interface.

Read more about wide area network in Network World's Wide Area Network section.


Originally published on Network World |  Click here to read the original story.
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