Judge sentences Anonymous hacker to 10 years in prison

Judge rejects arguments that Hammond acted for public good

By , IDG News Service |  Security

A member of the hacker group Anonymous was sentenced Friday to 10 years in prison for hacking into the computers of a geopolitical analysis firm.

Jeremy Hammond, 28, in May pled guilty to one count of conspiracy to engage in computer hacking under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act. He was sentenced by Chief U.S. District Judge Loretta Preska during a hearing at the federal district court for the Southern District of New York in New York.

Hammond, of Chicago, was arrested in March 2012 and charged with hacking into the computer system of analyst company Strategic Forecasting, also called Stratfor, and obtaining subscriber and credit-card information and emails, among other data. Ultimately, credit-card details, emails and cryptographic representation of passwords were leaked. The credit cards were used to make US$700,000 in purchases.

The sentencing was attended by supporters who view Hammond as a whistleblower revealing government secrets for the public good, much in the vein of WikiLeaks and former U.S. government contractor Edward Snowden. Hammond's lawyers argued that his acts were a form of civil disobedience against a government subcontractor, an argument Preska rejected.

Hammond was previously sentenced to jail time for a minor hacking incident when he was 19, and has gone by the names "Anarchaos," "sup_g," "burn," "yohoho," and others. He is the latest in the string of prominent hackers associated with Anonymous and hacker group LulzSec to be sentenced to jail time. The groups went on a hacking spree in 2011, breaking into servers and defacing websites of law enforcement agencies, private organizations and companies. The groups hit organizations such as the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation and the U.K.'s Serious Organized Crime Agency and bragged about their hacks on Twitter.

During the hearing, Hammond portrayed himself as a whistleblower, and said his hacks were intended to expose government secrets, data gathering and surveillance. Hammond's lawyers likened him to Daniel Ellsburg, who exposed secret government documents in 1970s about the Vietnam War in the name of the public interest.

Hammond admitted to breaking into servers of law enforcement agencies, private organizations, and companies that he said collaborated with government surveillance.

"I felt I had an obligation to use my skills... to bring the truth to life," Hammond said, adding that he believed government surveillance was exacerbated by the wars conducted by the U.S. started in 2001.

Hammond said he took to the streets to demand change, but became frustrated with civil protest, then took to hacking as a form of protest. He said he joined Anonymous because he liked its decentralized style of operation, which he described as a "digital dissent movement."

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