Google may pull out of China after cyberattacks

After attacks targeting the Gmail accounts of human rights activists, Google says it may leave China.

By , IDG News Service |  Security, China, Google

Google has decided to stop censoring its results in China and could end up closing its operations and shutting down its search engine there, the company said Tuesday.

The decision follows an attack on Google's servers in December that targeted the Gmail accounts of Chinese human rights activists, Google said in a blog post.

“These attacks and the surveillance they have uncovered -- combined with the attempts over the past year to further limit free speech on the web -- have led us to conclude that we should review the feasibility of our business operations in China,” David Drummond, Google's chief legal officer, wrote in the post.

In mid-December the company detected a “highly sophisticated and targeted attack” coming from China on its infrastructure that resulted in some of its intellectual property being stolen, Drummond wrote. He didn't disclose exactly what had been stolen.

Google later discovered it was not the only company targeted. “As part of our investigation we have discovered that at least twenty other large companies from a wide range of businesses -- including the Internet, finance, technology, media and chemical sectors -- have been similarly targeted,” Drummond said.

Google said it is in the process of notifying those companies and also working with U.S. authorities.

In addition, it found that the primary goal of the attacker seemed to be accessing Gmail accounts of Chinese human rights activists. Drummond said only two Gmail accounts were accessed, and that only account information and not the content of e-mails was accessed.

But separately, Google found that Gmail accounts of “dozens” of human rights advocates in the U.S., China and Europe have been “routinely accessed by third parties,” Drummond wrote. Those break-ins most likely happened as a result of phishing scams or malware and not through a security breach, he said.

“We have taken the unusual step of sharing information about these attacks with a broad audience not just because of the security and human rights implications of what we have unearthed, but also because this information goes to the heart of a much bigger global debate about freedom of speech,” Drummond wrote.

Google, like many other technology companies, has come under fire for bowing to censorship requirements imposed by the Chinese government. Google has argued in the past that it is better for China if Google operates any service there that increases access to information, even a censored one.

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