15 cloud companies to watch

By Beth Schultz, Network World |  Software

How the company got into cloud computing: Mazhar says he founded Kaavo in November 2007 to address the management, security and transparency challenges related to the cloud model.

NasuniHeadquarters: Natick, Mass.What it offers: Nasuni Filer is a cloud storage gateway that provides file access to select cloud storage services plus local caching, snapshots and other storage management capabilities. Once an enterprise installs and activates the gateway software – a network-attached storage (NAS) filer that runs on VMware – Nasuni bills for the filer as a service.How much it costs: $300 monthly over the cost of a supported cloud storage service

Why we're watching it: Nasuni addresses a challenge facing many would-be cloud storage users: the ability to move data into and out of the storage cloud in a simple, consistent manner.

While some cloud storage providers do support access via the CIFS, NFS or FTP, those gateways are fairly rudimentary, says Ray Lucchesi, president of Silverton Consulting. Nasuni not only offers an independent means of mapping CIFS files into storage clouds from Amazon, Iron Mountain, Nirvanix and Rackspace, but tops that capability off with nifty features such as a local data cache, file snapshot, data compression and encryption, and cloud management services. The latter includes performance monitoring and billing.

Who heads the company: CEO Andres Rodriguez, who founded Archivas, which Hitachi Data Systems acquired in 2006.

How did the company got into cloud computing: Rodriguez and fellow founder Robert Mason, both storage veterans, launched the company with the goal of extending the benefits of cloud storage to business., 

Navajo SystemsHeadquarters: New YorkWhat it offers: Virtual Private SaaS (VPS), for SaaS application data securityHow much it costs: 10% on top of the SaaS provider fee

Why we're watching it: For many enterprises, privacy and regulatory concerns are a deal-breaker for public cloud services. Navajo intends to change this with its unique approach to SaaS application data security.

Navajo has developed a scheme for transparently encrypting before transmitting sensitive application data to a SaaS provider. Likewise, encrypted data returning to the end user within the SaaS application responses is decrypted. The SaaS provider does not have an encryption key, making the data undecipherable to the cloud servers.

In other words, data at rest within the cloud remains encrypted and, because the sensitive data hosted outside of the company is unreadable, regulatory compliance is enforceable, says Dan Gross, Navajo CEO.


Originally published on Network World |  Click here to read the original story.
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