Using BI, BPM Data to Change Business Processes Fast

By Kim S. Nash , CIO |  Software, Analytics

"They were able to complete in a couple hours using multiple queries an analysis that before would have taken one to two weeks to complete," Roy says. "It's game-shifting change."

Business analysts were startled to find that half of CUNA Mutual's $2.8 billion in revenue comes from three of its 12 customer segments. Now the company wants to build financial products to attract the other nine. To appeal to Generation Y consumers, for example, CUNA Mutual is developing more Web and mobile access to products it offers to its credit unions. The company also built software that automatically offers life or disability insurance to people after they take out a loan, over whatever channel the customers used to close the deal-phone, website or in-person.

The new thinking has CUNA Mutual moving away from doing three or four large marketing pushes per year to 12 smaller ones focused on producing specific results: selling a particular product to new customers in a given demographic, for example, or gaining more profit from an existing customer segment. "You run the marketing, test it and use what you learn to start new campaigns," Roy says.

New Ways to Save While CUNA Mutual looks outward, at customer dynamics, Welch's, the grape juice and jelly cooperative, uses analytics to make internal operations, namely transportation, more efficient. During a 2007 upgrade of Oracle's enterprise resource planning suite, Welch's saw it needed newer tools to enable more flexible queries using multiple dimensions of data, says Kevin Kilcoyne, director of customer operations at the family farmer-owned co-op. The organization does manufacturing and marketing for the National Grape Cooperative Association.

Welch's wanted to collect every data element from each year's 40,000 orders and bills of lading, sweep it into a database and look for patterns to highlight where it could save money on transportation. Welch's auctions its transportation business to trucking companies every year.

At the time, Oracle's reporting tools couldn't perform the in-depth analysis Welch's wanted quickly enough, Kilcoyne says. To prepare for the auction, it took about 30 hours to cull a year's worth of data and then a few months for analysts to study it to decide how to formulate each bid request. Analysts consider routes, kinds of transportation available and fuel pricing trends, along with carriers' limitations and performance statistics.

Because so much time was involved, Welch's was not always able to bid out all of its distribution routes; typically it bid out only about 60% of them each year. The balance went largely unanalyzed and, therefore, unoptimized, says Bill Coyne, director of strategic sourcing.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Ask a Question