How to modernize your backup infrastructure

The technologies to vastly improve backup and recovery performance and reliability have arrived.

By W. Curtis Preston, InfoWorld |  Software, Backup & Recovery, recovery

Ever get the feeling that your backup system is behind the times? Do you read trade magazines and wonder if you're the only one still using an antiquated backup system? The first thing you should know is that you're not the only one. But your backup system could probably use some modernization.

New technologies have changed the nature of the backup game in a fundamental way, with disk playing an increasingly important role and tape moving further into the background. Many of the liabilities and performance issues that have dogged data center backups forever now have plausible technology solutions, provided those solutions are applied carefully and dovetail with primary storage strategy. It is truly a new day.

[ Get the full scoop on modernizing your backup systems in the InfoWorld "Backup Infrastructure Deep Dive" PDF special report. | Better manage your company's information overload with our Enterprise Data Explosion newsletter. ]

Before you contemplate a modernization plan, you need a working understanding of new high-speed disk based solutions, schemes that reduce the volume of data being replicated, and how real-time data protection techniques actually work. With that under your belt, you can start to apply those advancements to the real world data protection problems every data center faces.

The disk in the middle D2D2T (disk-to-disk-to-tape) strategies have gained popularity in recent years due to the great disparity between the devices being backed up (disks), the network carrying the backup, and the devices receiving the backup (tape). The average throughput of a disk drive 15 years ago was approximately 4MBps to 5MBps, and the most popular tape drive was 256KBps, so the bottleneck was the tape drive.

Fast-forward to today, and we have 70MBps disk drives, but tape drives that want 120MBps. Disks got 15 to 20 times faster, but tape drives got almost 500 times faster! Tape is no longer the bottleneck; it's starving to death. This is especially true when you realize that most backups are incremental and hold on to a tape drive for hours on end -- all the while moving only a few gigabytes of data.

D2D2T strategies solve this problem by placing a high-speed buffer between the fragmented, disk-based file systems and databases being backed up and the hungry tape drive. This buffer is a disk-based storage system designed to receive slow backups and supply them very quickly to a high-speed tape drive.


Originally published on InfoWorld |  Click here to read the original story.
Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

SoftwareWhite Papers & Webcasts

See more White Papers | Webcasts

Answers - Powered by ITworld

ITworld Answers helps you solve problems and share expertise. Ask a question or take a crack at answering the new questions below.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Ask a Question
randomness