Sorting through email archiving tools

By Logan G. Harbaugh, Network World |  Software, disaster recovery, email archiving

Between disaster recovery, compliance with legislative requirements and the need to meet e-discovery demands, enterprises should have some level of e-mail archiving in place. In addition, companies may need to archive other files, including Office documents, SharePoint, instant messaging, blogs and other social media.

The tricky part is that disaster recovery, compliance and e-discovery all have different requirements and functions. Disaster recovery focuses on retrieving the latest version of a document. Compliance can mean enforcing policies on e-mail content or complying with standards for keeping track of all documents that may have sensitive information. E-discovery involves responding to legal request for all documents pertaining to a particular topic.

Depending on your priorities, some key features to look for in an archiving product are search capabilities, auditing functions, deduplication, expandability, breadth of applications supported, and ease of setup.

Luckily or unluckily for enterprise IT execs, there are dozens of e-mail archiving products out there. This reflects the wide variety of reasons to archive and the difficulty in creating a system that will work well for all sizes of companies. We invited the top 30 vendors to participate and half said yes.

In Part 1 of this two-part review, we analyze seven leading products: Barracuda Message Archiver 450, Deepinvent MailStore 5.0.0.4468, GFI MailArchiver 6, Jatheon PnC 2.11, MetaLogix PAM 4.2.21, RedGate Exchange Server Archiver 3.0 and Symantec Enterprise Vault 9.0. In Part II, we will look at another batch of seven products.

In addition to performing basic e-mail archiving, we found that these tools can have other benefits. Archiving systems can save space on enterprise mail servers by moving older messages and attachments to inexpensive storage, leaving behind a 'stub' or placeholder.

If the user tries to open a message that has been stubbed, the archiving system transparently restores the message to the e-mail server. This can save on hardware costs, since a mail server generally requires high-performance storage, while archiving solutions can use inexpensive SATA-based storage that may cost a tenth as much.


Originally published on Network World |  Click here to read the original story.
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